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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
support the inflammatory flames heard on the floor of the u.s. senate used to block a u.n. treaty. a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the world. hundreds of millions. the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities. it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the u.n. treaty. 125 countries ratified it. but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republican senators voted against it. there names are right there. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute. some had signaled support for the treaty and then indicated they'd vote for it only to vote against it. one of the measure's co-sponsored, jerry mirrand, actually voted against it. so the guy who co-sponsored it voted against it. we asked him to come on the program yesterday, today as well. he declined. a former senator got involved on this as
that might support the inflammatory claims heard on the floor of the u.s. senate that were used to block a u.n. treaty, a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the entire world. now, the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities and it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. now, the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans or vets who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the treaty. 125 countries ratified the treaty but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republicans, senators, voted against it. their names right there on the right of the screen. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute, some senators had actually signaled support for the treaty, then indicated that they would vote for it only to vote against it. one of the actual measures co-sponsors of it, he actually voted against it. one of the co-sponsors. amazing. he voted against the bill he had co-sponsored. we asked him to com
as an m.a. i worked as an advisor to the israeli administration to the u.n. arafat speaking for the general assembly. very tumultuous period. i moved to israel and tried for this unit in the army. the tryouts are rather rigorous. i did 17 months of basic training. and got out just prior to the lebanon war. but in israel, we have -- you serve for a long period your regular serve and do reserve service to the age of 52. now i have a son in the army who is 19. and in a very elite unit. i am still doing reserve duty. we share uniforms. very bizarre. >> how old are you now? >> i'm 47. >> you can be called up at any time? >> i have been. i served in the latest intifada. in a combat role. >> where? >> in nablus. >> full combat uniform? >> i'm supposed to be semiretired. you stop jumping in the israeli army in the paratroopers at age 37 and cease being a combat soldier at age 42. at 42, 43, i was asked to stay on as an advisor on media relations. why not? sounds interesting. get good briefings. when the fighting broke out in the west bank, they asked any of the media advisors if the
and not in syria? a lot of people asked me, isn't syria like what happened in bosnia and so many, including u.n. officials have said what's happening in syria is very similar to what happened in bosnia with the wholesale slaughter of innocent civilians. i think from the administration's point of view they're looking at iraq and they don't want to get into an iraq-type of multi-year operation. >> and former senator george mitchell has said the united states needs to stay out of syria while senators mccain and lieberman said thursday that the u.s. must get involved. what is the fear if the u.s. does get involved? >> well, precisely that. that they don't want to get bogged down. nobody is talking about putting american boots on the ground or any other boots on the ground. the question is, can you take other military measures that will stop this war? i think what you have now, most sort of seasoned observers and most people who look at what could possibly be done to mitigate this nearly two-year war now in which more than 40,000 people, men, women and children have been slaughtered and after nearly
by the u.n show the opening day event in due by. delegates will update a treaty that applies to how phone calls are exchanged internationally. critics say it would be a mistake to apply the old standards to the age. . >> the internet is privately managed and it is crazy to bring back old school telephone regulations and apply it to the vibrant network. >> in a statement posted to the u.n website even before the conference began, the secretary general said the conference is not about giving governments control of the web. >> it must be to ensure communication technology including the two-third of the world population currently not on-line. >> critics say the conference raises a specter of china and russia replacing innovation and openness with sensorship. and while the u.n maintains this is not about controlling the web. analysts say the conference appears to be a steady part of the drip drip that under cuts free do. in washington, fox news. >>> tragedy overshadowing the duchess of cambridge's baby joy. we now have a picture of the british nurse who is believed to have taken her own life f
minister sergei lavrov and the u.n. envoy for syria, lakhdar brahimi. >> we reviewed the very mr. brahimi had his own additional information to contribute about what he is hearing from sources inside syria and both minister lavrov and i committed to support a renewed push by brahimi and his team to work with all the stakeholders in syria to begin a political transition. meanwhile, rebels in syria made the damascus international airport an official battleground. they said it's a legitimate target and they urged civilians to stay clear. fighting near the airport and around the capital city has intensified in the past week. the latest amateur video showed street battles and a car set afire by a rocket attack. the exiled leader of hamas khaled meshaal entered gaza today for the first time. it was, in part, a show of defiance after the militant group's latest clash with israel. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: he crossed the border from egypt with tears in his eyes. the leader of hamas setting foot on palestinian territory for the firs
home and cook. i will text message u.n. is done. >> excellent and really looking forward to it. >> today we're going to make the san francisco classic dish invented by italian and portuguese fishermen. it'll be like a nice spaghetti sauce. then we will put in the fish soup. the last thing is the dungeon as crab, let it all blend together. it will be delicious. when i could, i will try to make healthy meals with fresh ingredients, whatever is in season and local. those juicy, fresh tomatoes will take about an hour to cook down into a nice sauce. this is a good time to make our fish stock. we will take a step that seems like trash and boil it up in water and make a delicious and they speed up my parents were great clerics, and we had wonderful food. family dinners are very important. any chance you can sit down together and have a meal together, it is great communal atmosphere. one of the things i like the most is the opportunity to be creative. hello. anybody with sets their mind to it can cut. always nice to start chopping some vegetables and x and the delicious. all this doubl
the report that the u.p. report filed for the u.n.gen assembly when it was highlight, quote, pattern of systemic violations of human rights. iran has refused access to the united nations for several years, and the ug general assembly submitted a report in which he said he was, quote, deeply troubled by increased numbers of executions. a pew addition, arbitrary arrests and detention, unfair trials, torture, and ill treatment, and crackdown on human rights activityist, lawyers, journalist, and opposition activists, and to draw an example from the week's news theres actually what i gas what qualifies in iran for a slight bit of goodness. a well-known human rights lawyer ended her 49-day hunger strike on december 4th. her name is nasarn, and she has in prison since 2010, and the regime imposed a travel ban on her husband and her daughter so she was on a hunger strike for 49 days, and has actually stopped the hunger strike amid word the regime is going to lift the travel ban. so, the victories are small and hard-on and the news is relentlessly negative, but it comes at an interesting mome
states. >> laura: of course, not everyone sees it that way. joining me now are former u.n. ambassador to the united nations under president clinton nancy and nile at the heritage foundation. all right, nancy, let's look at your reaction. dick cheney comes out and says we are not respected and not feared. chaos everywhere. and we're not really seeing leadership from washington. what's your reaction to that? >> he is just out of touch and should take a page out of president bush's book and stay on the sidelines, write his memoirs but he is really not looking at the world as it is today. president obama has made this world safer. he has restored america's respect around the world. and it's actually teed up to have an extraordinary second term to make progress to keep us safe on a range of issues. i'm sure that's what he will do. >> laura: if you are somebody who doesn't follow things closely but you look at the images on television and syria, clashes in egypt, islamism rising through the parts of africa. it doesn't look like especially religious minorities, cause of freedom is really bei
option that by god u.n. after. and here i have to agree with ros. somebody with a big man with a backside if you're president of the united states can achieve a great deal. >> thank you very much. >> thank you all very much. can't knock [inaudible conversations] >> y aerators institute? >> i think the writers institute is something that's very important within the culture. we are a culture of words, a voice says. words are key to our imagination , our capacity to envision things. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page sensei's of writing, but i think there's no other art form so utterly sensible than perhaps film, which we work with, too. but there is that thing in literature it just captures the human spirit. >> commander of the u.s. military operation in the pacific, admiral samuel locklear spoke with pentagon reporters about north korea's plan to launch a satellite figure this one in violation of two u.n. security resolutions. he also talked about china's decision to the aircraft carrier in the obama administration shifted À la terry resources for the pacific region
profile opponents and former head of the u.n.'s nuclear regulatory agency. >> we will continue to push until we get a proper develop a institution. >> what is the key question? >> i think the key question is, is morsi's presidency in nature. and you have strong forces against him. everyone is united against him. >> behind him is the muslim brotherhood. and lately there is an indication apparently the armed forces protected him at the palace. if you get the muslim brotherhood and the armed forces behind him, he stays in power. >> there are now morsi's people. so the army is going to support him because he has put in all of his people to run the army. >> ryan? >> not all of his people and the armed forces are still somewhat aligned with the judiciary which is also packed with mubarek era people. morsi has taken them on. but seeing the reformers in the street is almost a hopeful sign. in a sense that they are assured -- having watched what happened to mubarek, i think morsi has got to be concerned. he has got to find some way to let a little air out of this balloon. but the fact that he h
sclinten a powder keg of instability in the region and beyond. the u.n. security council will likely vote authorizing a military intervention. similar african led super vention have provided a model for multilateral and regionly led solutions that allow the united states and our allies to provide operational support without putting boots on the ground. this will take time and stability cannot be restored through military action alone. the situation in malli is as much a crisis of governance as of security. the long running grievances between the north and the south must be addressed through diplomacy, rebuilding democratic institutions the restoration of democratically elected government. any agreement that tends to peel off groups aligned will require a credible government to do so. elections are the key to not only resolving and restoring now frozen assistance but reclaiming government control of the north and restoring the nearly three decade long history of democracy. the challenges cannot be addressed as separate issues as the recent report suggested. the international community must
for the inclusion of sold for rights in the u.n. declaration because i expected the u.s. stance to be more focused on individual rights or what we consider negative writes, freedom from oppression and controlled by the state but both roosevelts were absolutely crucial in including these social rights in the declaration of -- that didn't resonate here. it didn't resonate and there were also organized groups that worked to oppose the acceptance of such rights such as the medical profession. there was a specific campaign to prevent the u.s. from accepting economic and social rights in the 90s that was run by conservative groups. i think there is a lot of ideological resistance to assist -- social rights and also -- those have combined. less than fertile ground for social rights. >> my questions ends with knowledge of individual resistance to health-care which i grew up in germany so it's hard for me to understand why people even if they have ellises or family members with chronic illnesses why they are opposed to health care that actually helps them. at the individual level americans, wondering if yo
and the u.n. special envoy to syria. as you know, russia has blocked action against al assad at the u.n., but some have speculate that had moscow may be considering a different aprove. i mean, is russia stopping the u.s., do you think, from going into syria? >> i think the russians are beginning to realize that this problem simply cannot be ignored, and their passive stance on it simply doesn't provide for any constructive solution, so i hope that they will work with us on this, and i think the more international consensus we have on what is to be done, the less likely is the danger that the removal of the regime will result in the fragmentation of syria all together and regional conflicts erupting. that is the real danger, and that's what people should be concentrating on. >> you know, some have made the comparison that getting involved with syria or in syria is similar to us getting involved in libya and taking action against libya. do you see it that way? >> not quite. i supported strongly the position that the united states took on libya because there was an identifiable enemy, and
, isn't syria like what happened in bosnia? and so many, including u.n. officials have said what's happening in syria is very similar to what's happened in bosnia with the wholesale slaughter of innocent civilians. but i think from the administration's point of view, they're looking at iraq and they don't want to get into an iraq type of multi-year operation. >> and former senator george mitchell has said the united states needs to stay out syria, while senator mccain said they need to get involved. what is at stake? >> they don't want to get bogged down. nobody is talk about putting american boots on the ground. the question is can you take other military measures that will stop this war? i think what you have now, most seasoned observers and most people who look at what could possibly be done to mitigate this nearly two-year war now in which more than 40,000 people, men, women, and children have been slaughtered and after nearly two years of this administration saying, you know, the assad must step down, and it not happening. the best one can hope for, perhaps, is that some kin
sign they are not interested in mending their obstructionist ways. the senate was set to ratify the u.n. convention on the rights of persons with disabilities which has already been ratified about 126 countries worldwide and seeks to protect 700 million people with disabilities from discrimination. the convention was based on the landmark americans with disabilities act, which came to pass with the help of republican senator bob dole. the former senate majority leader was on hand to compel his fellow republicans to ratify the u.n. treaty. even an 89-year-old former colleague confined to a wheelchair couldn't unblock this party's entrance see yens. 66 votes were required to ratify the treaty. 38 u.s. senators, all republicans, found reasons to vote against it. they voted against a treaty that said people with disabilities need to be afforded the same right as other people. 38 senators voted no. yet these are the people we're expecting to do what is best for the country and find a compromise to avert the fiscal cliff. how's that going be working for us? next. [ male announcer ] when it co
by the regime and the u.n. says more than 2.5 million people have been forced from their homes. blasts like this have become commonplace in places across syria, but the red line has always been the use of chemical weapons by assad's forces. >> we have set an unmistakable message that this would cross a red line and those responsible would be held to account. >> if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> held accountable. it's unclear exactly what that means, but what about military intervention to stop the assad regime. >> the president of the united states has made very clear that there will be consequences. there will be consequences. if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using these chemical weapons on their own people. >> i'm not going to telegraph in any specifics what we would do in the event of credible evidence that the assad regime has resorted to using chemical weapons against their own people. but suffice to say, we are certainly planning to take action, if that eventuality were to occur. >> a p
forward with democracy and in fact, the u.n. rights official was slamming credibility of egypt's new constitution? >> yeah, well, there's a lot of political rhetoric here, but let's remember that when parliamentary elections were held some months ago, the muslim brotherhood and radical groups got three quarters of the seats and morsi himself in the run-off election won to be sure and both of those were characterized as free and fair, but it's also clear that fighting in the streets isn't exactly a democratic process either and i think that the military does not want to get back in the business of government, but they're not prepared to see the chaos continue. >> ambassador for those of us living in the united states and the western world and not really fully understanding what this draft constitution is, relate it this way. when the activist warned that if this constitution a passed, cairo will truly become kandahar with a blessing of the egyptian president and the muslim brotherhood referring to the home city. and is that at the heart of this and demonstration that is we're seeing n
. why the senate would vote down a u.n. treaty to support universal rights for the disabled. but they did, 38 senators voted no. some of the so-called facts about the treaty are simply fabrications. ahead on the program, pretty spirited discussion. i interview one of the senators who voted no. senator mike lee. i confront him about those facts. also former u.s. attorney general dick thornburg, a republican, who has a disabled child and still holds out hope the treaty will pass. >>> plus, a legal battle to tell you about over 21-month-old child named talia. her mother gave her up for adoption without the father's knowledge or permission while he was away from home serving in the military. now he wants talia back. the child's fate hinges on a judge's decision. we'll tell you how the why you ruled and speak with talia's dad. those stories and landmark cases making it to the supreme court. it will decide the issue of same sex marriage. all that ahead along with the "ridiculist." >> "360" coming up in ten minutes. >>> our fifth story "outfront" tragedy in london. a nurse at the h
-- namely, the one enunciated by the international court of justice, the u.n., human rights organizations -- this framework is the furthermost limit to which jewish liberal opinion can be carried, because it is the limit of the global liberal consensus. the end of the american jewish romance with israel will be a boon not only for the palestinians, but for the israelis as well. since the june 1967 war, israel has been a stage on which american jews have played out their fantasies of toughnesses, often from martha's vineyard -- [laughter] and a pawn in their pursuit of power and privilege. if israel has become a crazy state -- and it has -- it is in no small part because of american jews. by abetting its most retrograde tendencies and freeing it of needful restraints, they have exerted the baleful influence on israeli society. but american jews now have an opportunity to right a double wrong; the horror inflicts on palestine -- inflicted on palestine and the damage caused to israel. if the liberal conscience of american jews is pricked and finally they do the right thing, the long, dark ni
foot long u.s. navy ship came n it is it husing vole tears and they also had volunteers on board. >> nearly 200 red cross and fema core volunteers are living in an unconventional place. never in my wildest. it is not only helping people but it is an adventir. >> they are cysting for own a month now. >> fema score vool ears are serving the drs set nupt tri-state area. >> they are coming in the drc right off of the street . they run out of the doredoors. >> volunteers are building relationship with the storm survivors and fellow volunteers. >> it is it always eating together and work together. >> it is not always easy. being around devastation is mentally exhausting. snorks not only do we work with the people in the shelter but the volunteers that are assigned to the shelter . living quarters are less than lex ourous. >> i didn't know i was going to sleep in a coffin. >> i will make the best of the where ever i am assigned. >> even if it is on a ship and this is the shelter they talk about for most of the life. >> we say let's go home and we are coming home here it is it like a hom
in benghazi. take a listen. >> susan rice has done a great job as our u.n. ambassador. she has been a stalwart colleague in a lot of the tough decisions that we've had to make. and certainly with respect to defending our national interests and national security at the united nations. >> so clinton is also going to testify on benghazi next week. what are the politics of all of this for secretary clinton? and are there risks for her here? >> i don't think there are necessarily risks for her here as long as she stays out of the whole fray of susan rice and congressional republicans. there's an awful lot going on on that score, but i tnk hillary clinton may be able to keep herself above all that. by the way, we keep expecting the white house for this rice situation to be resolved. we fully expect president clinton to make -- excuse me, president obama to make his announcement about his national security team any day now. >> what do you hear with regards to that, david? are you hearing that susan race is going -- susan rice is going to get the nod or that the waters are shark infested and -- >> com
>> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening everyone. i'm susie gharib. the unemployment rate drops to a four year low as u.s. businesses add 146,000 jobs in november. we look behind the numbers. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. we meet the c.e.o.'s of three small businesses hiring right now. what they do and why they're looking for help. >> susie: and house speaker boehner accuses president obama of wasting another week in the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the job market is proving to be surprisingly resilient. american employers hired 146,000 workers in november, much more than expected. and the unemployment rate fell to 7.7%, the lowest level since december of 2008. as erika miller reports, that wasn't the only surprise in today's report. >> reporter: almost no one on wall street saw this good news coming. there was every reason to think hiring would be weak last month. after all, many parts of the east coast are still recovering from devastation caused by superstorm sandy. >> i think the most likely explanation here is sandy's impact was
news and information services worldwide. captioning sponsored by rose communication >> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening everyone. i'm susie gharib. the unemployment rate drops to a four year low as u.s. businesses add 146,000 jobs in november. we look behind the numbers. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. we meet the c.e.o.'s of three small businesses hiring right now. what they do and why they're looking for help. >> susie: and house speaker boehner accuses president obama of wasting another week in the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> tom: that and more tonight on
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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)

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